The Road to the Stars

This photograph shows the road to the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA)’s Operations Support Facility (OSF) and then on further to the breathtaking Chajnantor Plateau at 5000 metres above sea level. The plateau, situated in Chilean Puna in the Atacama region, is home to the Array Operations Site (AOS) and is the site of the highest and driest astronomical observatory on Earth.

The OSF is the centre of activities for the ALMA project and is where all staff and contractors are accommodated — only 2900 metres above sea level. This is where all the scientific operations related to the daily operation of the observatory take place.

The AOS houses a technical building — the second highest building on Earth — along with the ALMA correlator, the highest and fastest computer ever used at an astronomical site. Due to the high altitude, human operations are kept to a minimum.

ALMA will address some of the deepest questions of our cosmic origins as it explores the cool Universe – in particular molecular clouds, star formation and planetary systems.

Credit:

NAOJ/ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO)

A estrada para as estrelas

Esta fotografia mostra a estrada para o Local de Apoio às Operações do Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) e depois até ao pico do planalto do Chajnantor, 5000 metros acima do nível do mar. O planalto, situado naPuna chilena na região do Atacama, abriga o Local de Operações da Rede e é o local mais alto e mais seco da Terra onde está instalado um observatório astronômico.

O Local de Apoio às Operações é o centro das atividades do projeto ALMA e é aí que está instalado todo o pessoal que trabalha no projeto, a apenas 2900 metros acima do nível do mar. É onde se executam todas as operações científicas relacionadas com a operação diária do observatório.

Os edifícios no Local de Operações da Rede contam com um edifício técnico – o edifício construído no segundo local mais alto na face da Terra – e o correlacionador do ALMA, o computador mais rápido já usado num local astronômico. Devido à elevada altitude, tenta-se manter ao mínimo possível as operações que são executadas por humanos.

O ALMA pesquisa as questões mais profundas relacionadas com as nossas origens cósmicas ao explorar o Universo frio – em particular nuvens moleculares, formação estelar e sistemas planetários.

Crédito:

NAOJ/ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO)

Camino a las estrellas

Esta fotografía muestra el camino que lleva al el centro de apoyo a las operaciones (OSF, Operations Support Facility) de ALMA (Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array) y luego continúa hacia el impresionante llano de Chajnantor, a 5.000 metros sobre el nivel del mar. La meseta, situada en la chilena Puna de Atacama, alberga el centro de operaciones del conjunto de antenas (AOS, Array Operations Site) y es el observatorio astronómico más alto y más seco de la Tierra.

El OSF es el centro de actividades del proyecto ALMA, y es donde se aloja todo el personal (ya sea de plantilla o subcontratado) — a tan sólo 2.900 metros sobre el nivel del mar. Aquí es donde tienen lugar todas las operaciones científicas relacionadas con la operación diaria del observatorio.

El AOS alberga un edificio técnico — el segundo edificio a mayor altitud de la Tierra — junto con el correlacionador de ALMA, el ordenador más rápido usado jamás en un lugar de observación astronómica. Debido a la altitud, las operaciones humanas se mantienen al mínimo.

ALMA quiere responder algunas de las preguntas más profundas relacionadas con nuestros orígenes cósmicos a medida que explora el universo frío – especialmente, nubes moleculares, formación de estrellas y sistemas planetarios.

Crédito:

NAOJ/ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO)

La strada verso le stelle

Questa fotografia mostra la strada verso il centro operativo (Operations Support Facility, OSF) dell’Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) e oltre verso l’altipiano mozzafiato di Chajnantor a 5000 metri di altitudine sopra il livello del mare. L’altipiano, situato nella Puna cilena della regione di Atacama, ospita il sito di attività della rete (Array Operations Site, AOS) ed è il più alto e il più secco osservatorio al mondo.

L’OSF è il centro di attività per il progetto ALMA e anche il luogo dove alloggiano tutti i membri dello staff – a solo 2900 metri sopra il livello del mare. È qui che tutte le operazioni scientifiche quotidiane dell’osservatorio vengono svolte.

L’AOS ospita un edifico tecnico – il secondo edificio situato più in alto sulla Terra – insieme al correlatore di ALMA il computer più alto e più veloce mai utilizzato in un sito astronomico.

Proprio a causa dell’altitudine gli interventi umani sono mantenuti al minimo.

ALMA risponderà ad alcune delle domande più fondamentali sulle nostre origini cosmiche mentre esplora l’universo freddo – in particolare le nubi molecolari, la formazione stellare e i sistemi planetari.

Crediti:

NAOJ/ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO)

eso1531-en-gb — Science Release

First Detection of Lithium from an Exploding Star

29 July 2015

The chemical element lithium has been found for the first time in material ejected by a nova. Observations of Nova Centauri 2013 made using telescopes at ESO’s La Silla Observatory, and near Santiago in Chile, help to explain the mystery of why many young stars seem to have more of this chemical element than expected. This new finding fills in a long-missing piece in the puzzle representing our galaxy’s chemical evolution, and is a big step forward for astronomers trying to understand the amounts of different chemical elements in stars in the Milky Way.

The light chemical element lithium is one of the few elements that is predicted to have been created by the Big Bang, 13.8 billion years ago. But understanding the amounts of lithium observed in stars around us today in the Universe has given astronomers headaches. Older stars have less lithium than expected [1], and some younger ones up to ten times more [2].

Since the 1970s, astronomers have speculated that much of the extra lithium found in young stars may have come fromnovae — stellar explosions that expel material into the space between the stars, where it contributes to the material that builds the next stellar generation. But careful study of several novae has yielded no clear result up to now.

A team led by Luca Izzo (Sapienza University of Rome, and ICRANet, Pescara, Italy) has now used the FEROS instrument on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory, as well the PUCHEROS spectrograph on the ESO 0.5-metre telescope at the Observatory of the Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile in Santa Martina near Santiago, to study the nova Nova Centauri 2013 (V1369 Centauri). This star exploded in the southern skies close to the bright star Beta Centauri in December 2013 and was the brightest nova so far this century — easily visible to the naked eye [3].

The very detailed new data revealed the clear signature of lithium being expelled at two million kilometres per hour from the nova [4]. This is the first detection of the element ejected from a nova system to date.

Co-author Massimo Della Valle (INAF–Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, Naples, and ICRANet, Pescara, Italy) explains the significance of this finding: “It is a very important step forward. If we imagine the history of the chemical evolution of the Milky Way as a big jigsaw, then lithium from novae was one of the most important and puzzling missing pieces. In addition, any model of the Big Bang can be questioned until the lithium conundrum is understood.”

The mass of ejected lithium in Nova Centauri 2013 is estimated to be tiny (less than a billionth of the mass of the Sun), but, as there have been many billions of novae in the history of the Milky Way, this is enough to explain the observed and unexpectedly large amounts of lithium in our galaxy.

Authors Luca Pasquini (ESO, Garching, Germany) and Massimo Della Valle have been looking for evidence of lithium in novae for more than a quarter of a century. This is the satisfying conclusion to a long search for them. And for the younger lead scientist there is a different kind of thrill:

“It is very exciting,” says Luca Izzo, “to find something that was predicted before I was born and then first observed on my birthday in 2013!”

Notes

[1] The lack of lithium in older stars is a long-standing puzzle. Results on this topic include these press releases:eso1428, eso1235 and eso1132.

[2] More precisely, the terms “younger” and “older” are used to refer to what astronomers call Population I and Population II stars. The Population I category includes the Sun; these stars are rich in heavier chemical elements and form the disc of the Milky Way. Population II stars are older, with a low heavy-element content, and are found in the Milky Way Bulge and Halo, and globular star clusters. Stars in the “younger” Population I class can still be several billion years old!

[3] These comparatively small telescopes, equipped with suitable spectrographs, are powerful tools for this kind of research. Even in the era of extremely large telescopes smaller telescopes dedicated to specific tasks can remain very valuable.

[4] This high velocity, from the nova towards the Earth, means that the wavelength of the line in the absorption in the spectrum due to the presence of lithium is significantly shifted towards the blue end of the spectrum.

More information

This research was presented in a paper entitled “Early optical spectra of Nova V1369 Cen show presence of lithium”, by L. Izzo et al., published online in the Astrophysical Journal Letters.

The team is composed of Luca Izzo (Sapienza University of Rome, and ICRANet, Pescara, Italy), Massimo Della Valle (INAF–Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, Naples; ICRANet, Pescara, Italy), Elena Mason (INAF–Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, Trieste, Italy), Francesca Matteucci (Universitá di Trieste, Trieste, Italy), Donatella Romano (INAF–Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Bologna, Italy), Luca Pasquini (ESO, Garching bei Munchen, Germany), Leonardo Vanzi (Department of Electrical Engineering and Center of Astro Engineering, PUC-Chile, Santiago, Chile), Andres Jordan (Institute of Astrophysics and Center of Astro Engineering, PUC-Chile, Santiago, Chile), José Miguel Fernandez (Institute of Astrophysics, PUC-Chile, Santiago, Chile), Paz Bluhm (Institute of Astrophysics, PUC-Chile, Santiago, Chile), Rafael Brahm (Institute of Astrophysics, PUC-Chile, Santiago, Chile), Nestor Espinoza (Institute of Astrophysics, PUC-Chile, Santiago, Chile) and Robert Williams (STScI, Baltimore, Maryland, USA).

ESO is the foremost intergovernmental astronomy organisation in Europe and the world’s most productive ground-based astronomical observatory by far. It is supported by 16 countries: Austria, Belgium, Brazil, the Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Finland, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom, along with the host state of Chile. ESO carries out an ambitious programme focused on the design, construction and operation of powerful ground-based observing facilities enabling astronomers to make important scientific discoveries. ESO also plays a leading role in promoting and organising cooperation in astronomical research. ESO operates three unique world-class observing sites in Chile: La Silla, Paranal and Chajnantor. At Paranal, ESO operates the Very Large Telescope, the world’s most advanced visible-light astronomical observatory and two survey telescopes. VISTA works in the infrared and is the world’s largest survey telescope and the VLT Survey Telescope is the largest telescope designed to exclusively survey the skies in visible light. ESO is a major partner in ALMA, the largest astronomical project in existence. And on Cerro Armazones, close to Paranal, ESO is building the 39-metre European Extremely Large Telescope, the E-ELT, which will become “the world’s biggest eye on the sky”.

Links

Contacts

Luca Izzo
Sapienza University of Rome/ICRANet
Pescara, Italy
Email: luca.izzo@gmail.com

Massimo Della Valle
INAF–Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte
Naples, Italy
Email: dellavalle@na.astro.it

Luca Pasquini
ESO
Garching bei München, Germany
Tel: +49 89 3200 6792
Email: lpasquin@eso.org

Richard Hook
ESO Public Information Officer
Garching bei München, Germany
Tel: +49 89 3200 6655
Cell: +49 151 1537 3591
Email: rhook@eso.org

Connect with ESO on social media

This is a translation of ESO Press Release eso1531.

About the Release

Release No.: eso1531-en-gb
Name: Nova Centauri 2013
Type: • Milky Way : Star : Type : Variable : Nova
Facility: MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope

Images

Nova Centauri 2013

Nova Centauri 2013

Nova Centauri 2013 seen from La Silla

Nova Centauri 2013 seen from La Silla

The location of Nova Centauri 2013

The location of Nova Centauri 2013

The sky around the location of Nova Centauri 2013

The sky around the location of Nova Centauri 2013

The Milky Way and Nova Centauri 2013

The Milky Way and Nova Centauri 2013

Videos

Zooming in on Nova Centauri 2013

Zooming in on Nova Centauri 2013
in English only

Also see our


eso1531pt-br — Nota de imprensa científica

Primeira detecção de lítio numa estrela em explosão

29 de Julho de 2015

O elemento químico lítio foi encontrado pela primeira vez em material ejetado por uma nova. Observações da Nova Centauri 2013 obtidas com o auxílio de telescópios no Observatório de La Silla do ESO e perto de Santiago do Chile, ajudaram a explicar por que é que muitas estrelas jovens parecem ter mais quantidade deste elemento químico do que o esperado. Esta nova descoberta acrescenta uma importante peça que faltava ao quebra-cabeças que representa a evolução química da nossa Galáxia e é um enorme passo em frente na compreensão das quantidades dos diferentes elementos químicos nas estrelas da Via Láctea.

O elemento químico leve lítio é um dos poucos elementos que se prevê ter sido criado pelo Big Bang, há 13,8 bilhões de anos atrás. No entanto, tentar compreender as quantidades de lítio observadas nas estrelas que nos rodeiam hoje tem sido um processo muito difícil. Estrelas mais velhas possuem menos lítio do que o esperado [1] e algumas estrelas jovens têm dez vezes mais lítio do que o que pensávamos [2].

Desde os anos 1970 que os astrônomos especulam que a enorme quantidade de lítio encontrado nas estrelas jovens poderá vir de novas —  explosões estelares que libertam material para o espaço entre as estrelas, contribuindo assim para a matéria que forma a próxima geração de estrelas. No entanto, observações cuidadas de várias novas não tinham, até agora, fornecido resultados claros.

Uma equipe liderada por Luca Izzo (Universidade Sapienza de Roma e ICRANet, Pescara, Itália) utilizou o instrumento FEROS montado no telescópio MPG/ESO de 2,2 metros instalado no Observatório de La Silla, assim como o espectrógrafo PUCHEROS montado no telescópio de 0,5 metros do ESO, no Observatório da Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile em Santa Marina, perto de Santiago, para estudar a nova Nova Centauri 2013 (V1369 Centauri). Esta estrela explodiu no céu austral perto da estrela brilhante Beta Centauri em dezembro de 2013, tratando-se, até agora, da nova mais brilhante deste século — facilmente observada a olho nu [3].

Os novos dados extremamente detalhados revelaram uma assinatura clara de lítio a ser expelido da nova com uma velocidade de dois milhões de quilômetros por hora [4]. Trata-se da primeira detecção, até à data, de lítio sendo ejetado por uma nova.

O co-autor Massimo Della Valle (INAF — Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, Nápoles, e ICRANet, Pescara, Itália) explica a importância desta descoberta: “Trata-se de um importantíssimo passo em frente. Se imaginarmos a história da evolução química da Via Láctea como um enorme quebra-cabeças, então o lítio das novas corresponde de uma das peças mais importantes e difíceis de encontrar que faltavam. Adicionalmente, qualquer modelo do Big Bang é sempre questionável até este problema do lítio estar resolvido.”

Estima-se que a massa do lítio ejetado pela Nova Centauri 2013 é minúscula (menos de uma bilionésima parte da massa do Sol), no entanto, uma vez que existiram muitos bilhões de novas ao longo da história da Via Láctea, tal quantidade é suficiente para explicar as quantidades inesperadamente grandes de lítio observadas na nossa Galáxia.

Os autores Luca Pasquini (ESO, Garching, Alemanha) e Massimo Della Vella procuram evidências de lítio em novas desde há mais de um quarto de século. Esta é por isso uma conclusão muito satisfatória da sua longa busca. E para o jovem cientista líder do projeto existe outro tipo de satisfação:

É muito excitante,” diz Luca Izzo, “encontrar algo que foi previsto antes de eu nascer e que foi depois observado no dia do meu aniversário em 2013!

Notas

[1] A falta de lítio em estrelas mais velhas é um mistério de longa data. Resultados sobre este tópico foram descritos nas notas de imprensa: eso1428, eso1235 e eso1132.

[2] Mais precisamente, os termos “mais jovens” e “mais velhas” são usados para nos referirmos a estrelas de População I e População II. As estrelas de População I, que incluem o Sol, são estrelas ricas em elementos químicos mais pesados e formam o disco da Via Láctea. As estrelas de População II são mais velhas, com baixo conteúdo em elementos pesados e encontram-se no bojo e no halo da Via Láctea e nos aglomerados estelares globulares. As estrelas da População I “jovem” podem no entanto ter vários bilhões de anos!

[3] Estes comparativamente pequenos telescópios equipados com espectrógrafos apropriados são ferramentas poderosas para este tipo de trabalho. Mesmo na era dos telescópios extremamente grandes, os telescópios mais pequenos dedicados a tarefas específicas permanecem imensamente valiosos.

[4] Esta alta velocidade, da nova relativamente à Terra, significa que o comprimento de onda da risca de absorção relativa à presença de lítio se encontra significativamente deslocada para a parte azul do espectro.

Mais Informações

Este trabalho foi descrito num artigo científico intitulado “Early optical spectra of Nova V1369 Cen show presence of lithium”, de L. Izzo et al., que foi publicado online na revista especializada Astrophysical Journal Letters.

A equipe é composta por Luca Izzo (Universidade Sapienza de Roma e ICRANet, Pescara, Itália), Massimo Della Valle (INAF–Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, Nápoles; ICRANet, Pescara, Itália), Elena Mason (INAF–Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, Trieste, Itália), Francesca Matteucci (Universitá di Trieste, Trieste, Itália), Donatella Romano (INAF–Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Bologna, Itália), Luca Pasquini (ESO, Garching bei Munchen, Alemanha), Leonardo Vanzi (Departamento de Engenharia Eléctrica e Centro de Astro-Engenharia, PUC-Chile, Santiago, Chile), Andres Jordan (Instituto de Astrofísica e Centro de Astro-Engenharia, PUC-Chile, Santiago, Chile), José Miguel Fernandez (Instituto de Astrofísica, PUC-Chile, Santiago, Chile), Paz Bluhm (Instituto de Astrofísica, PUC-Chile, Santiago, Chile), Rafael Brahm (Instituto de Astrofísica, PUC-Chile, Santiago, Chile), Nestor Espinoza (Institute de Astrofísica, PUC-Chile, Santiago, Chile) e Robert Williams (STScI, Baltimore, Maryland, EUA).

O ESO é a mais importante organização europeia intergovernamental para a investigação em astronomia e é de longe o observatório astronômico mais produtivo do mundo. O ESO é  financiado por 16 países: Alemanha, Áustria, Bélgica, Brasil, Dinamarca, Espanha, Finlândia, França, Holanda, Itália, Polônia, Portugal, Reino Unido, República Checa, Suécia e Suíça, assim como pelo Chile, o país de acolhimento. O ESO destaca-se por levar a cabo um programa de trabalhos ambicioso, focado na concepção, construção e operação de observatórios astronômicos terrestres de ponta, que possibilitam aos astrônomos importantes descobertas científicas. O ESO também tem um papel importante na promoção e organização de cooperação na investigação astronômica. O ESO mantém em funcionamento três observatórios de ponta no Chile: La Silla, Paranal e Chajnantor. No Paranal, o ESO opera  o Very Large Telescope, o observatório astronômico ótico mais avançado do mundo e dois telescópios de rastreio. O VISTA, o maior telescópio de rastreio do mundo que trabalha no infravermelho e o VLT Survey Telescope, o maior telescópio concebido exclusivamente para mapear os céus no visível. O ESO é um parceiro principal no ALMA, o maior projeto astronômico que existe atualmente. E no Cerro Armazones, próximo do Paranal, o ESO está a construir o European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) de 39 metros, que será “o maior olho do mundo virado para o céu”.

Links

Contatos

Gustavo Rojas
Universidade Federal de São Carlos
São Carlos, Brazil
Tel.: 551633519797
e-mail: grojas@ufscar.br

Luca Izzo
Sapienza University of Rome/ICRANet
Pescara, Italy
e-mail: luca.izzo@gmail.com

Massimo Della Valle
INAF–Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte
Naples, Italy
e-mail: dellavalle@na.astro.it

Luca Pasquini
ESO
Garching bei München, Germany
Tel.: +49 89 3200 6792
e-mail: lpasquin@eso.org

Richard Hook
ESO Public Information Officer
Garching bei München, Germany
Tel.: +49 89 3200 6655
Cel.: +49 151 1537 3591
e-mail: rhook@eso.org

Connect with ESO on social media

Este texto é a tradução da Nota de Imprensa do ESO eso1531, cortesia do ESON, uma rede de pessoas nos Países Membros do ESO, que servem como pontos de contato local para a imprensa. O representante brasileiro é Gustavo Rojas, da Universidade Federal de São Carlos. A nota de imprensa foi traduzida por Margarida Serote (Portugal) e adaptada para o português brasileiro por Gustavo Rojas.

eso1531es-cl — Comunicado científico

Primera detección de litio proveniente de la explosión de una estrella

29 de Julio de 2015

Por primera vez se ha encontrado litio en el material expulsado por una nova. Observaciones de la nova Centauri 2013 llevadas a cabo con telescopios instalados en el Observatorio La Silla y cerca de Santiago de Chile, ayudan a explicar el misterio de por qué muchas estrellas jóvenes parecen tener más cantidad de la esperada de este elemento químico. Este nuevo hallazgo responde a una pregunta pendiente desde hace mucho tiempo sobre la evolución química de nuestra galaxia y es un gran paso adelante para los astrónomos que tratan de explicar las cantidades de los diferentes elementos químicos que hay en las estrellas de la Vía Láctea.

El litio, un elemento químico ligero, es uno de los pocos elementos que, según las predicciones, fue creado durante el Big Bang, hace 13.800 millones de años. Pero comprender las cantidades de litio observado en las estrellas que hoy nos rodean en el universo ha generado no pocos quebraderos de cabeza a los astrónomos. Las estrellas más viejas tienen menos litio del esperado [1] y algunas más jóvenes hasta diez veces más [2].

Desde los años 70, los astrónomos han especulado que gran parte del litio de más de las  estrellas jóvenes pudo haber venido de las novas (explosiones estelares que expulsan material al espacio que hay entre las estrellas, sumándose al material que construye la siguiente generación estelar). Pero un cuidadoso estudio de varias novas no ha arrojado ningún resultado claro hasta ahora.

Un equipo dirigido por Luca Izzo (Universidad la Sapienza de Roma e ICRANet, Pescara, Italia) ha utilizado el instrumento FEROS, instalado en el Telescopio MPG/ESO de 2,2 metros, en el Observatorio La Silla, así como el espectrógrafo PUCHEROS, instalado en el telescopio de 0,5 metros de ESO en el Observatorio de la Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, en Santa Martina (cerca de Santiago), para estudiar la nova Centauri 2013 (V1369 Centauri). Esta estrella explotó en los cielos del sur cerca de la brillante estrella Beta Centauri en diciembre de 2013 y fue la nova más brillante de este siglo, fácilmente visible a ojo desnudo [3].

Los nuevos datos, muy detallados, revelaron la firma clara de litio expulsado desde la nova a dos millones de kilómetros por hora [4]. Por ahora, se trata de la primera vez que se detecta este elemento siendo expulsado de un sistema nova.

El coautor, Massimo Della Valle (INAF, Observatorio Astronómico de Capodimonte, Nápoles, e ICRANet, Pescara, Italia), explica el significado de este hallazgo: “es un paso adelante muy importante. Si nos imaginamos la historia de la evolución química de la Vía Láctea como un gran rompecabezas, entonces el litio de las novas fue una de las piezas ausentes más importantes y desconcertantes. Además, se puede poner en cuestión cualquier modelo del Big Bang mientras no se comprenda el problema del litio“.

Se estima que la masa de litio expulsada por la nova Centauri 2013 es pequeña (menos de una milmillonésima parte de la masa del Sol), pero, como ha habido muchos miles de millones de novas en la historia de la Vía Láctea, es suficiente para explicar las cantidades de litio inesperadamente grandes observadas en nuestra galaxia.

Los autores Luca Pasquini (ESO, Garching, Alemania) y Massimo Della Valle han estado buscando pruebas de la presencia de litio en novas durante más de un cuarto de siglo. Para ellos, esta es la satisfactoria conclusión de una larga búsqueda. Y para el líder científico más joven, es un tipo diferente de emoción:

“¡Es muy emocionante“, dice Luca Izzo, “encontrar algo cuya existencia se predijo antes de que naciera y luego observarlo por primera vez el día de mi cumpleaños en 2013!”.

Notas

[1] Hace mucho tiempo que la falta de litio en estrellas viejas es un rompecabezas. Estas notas de prensa contienen información al respecto: http://www.eso.org/public/spain/news/eso1428/,http://www.eso.org/public/spain/news/eso1235/ y  http://www.eso.org/public/spain/news/eso1132/.

[2] En concreto, se utilizan los términos “jóvenes” y “viejas” para referirse a lo que los astrónomos llaman estrellas de población I y población II. La población I incluye al Sol; estas estrellas son ricas en elementos químicos más pesados y forman el disco de la Vía Láctea. Las estrellas de población II son mayores, con bajo contenido en elementos pesados y se encuentran en el bulbo y el halo de la Vía Láctea y en los cúmulos globulares de estrellas. Aunque las estrellas de la población I, más “jóvenes”, ¡pueden tener miles de millones de años de edad!

[3] Estos telescopios comparativamente pequeños, equipados con espectrógrafos adecuados, son poderosas herramientas para este tipo de investigación. Incluso en la era de los telescopios extremadamente grandes, los telescopios más pequeños dedicados a tareas específicas pueden seguir siendo muy valiosos.

[4] Esta alta velocidad, desde la nova hacia la Tierra, significa que la longitud de onda de la línea de absorción del espectro debida a la presencia de litio se desplaza considerablemente hacia el extremo azul del espectro.

Información adicional

Este trabajo de investigación se ha presentado en el artículo científico titulado “Early optical spectra of Nova V1369 Cen show presence of lithium”, por L. Izzo et al., publicado en línea en la revista Astrophysical Journal Letters.

El equipo está formado por Luca Izzo (Universidad la Sapienza de Roma e ICRANet, Pescara, Italia); Massimo Della Valle (INAF–Observatorio Astronómico de Capodimonte, Nápoles; ICRANet, Pescara, Italia); Elena Mason (INAF–Observatorio Astronímico de Trieste, Trieste, Italia); Francesca Matteucci (Universidad de Trieste, Trieste, Italia); Donatella Romano (INAF–Observatorio Astronómico de Bolonia, Bolonia, Italia); Luca Pasquini (ESO, Garching, Múnich, Alemania); Leonardo Vanzi (Departamento de Ingeniería Eléctrica y Centro de Astro Ingeniería, PUC-Chile, Santiago, Chile); Andrés Jordan (Instituto de Astrofísica y Centro de Astro Ingeniería, PUC-Chile, Santiago, Chile); José Miguel Fernández (Instituto de Astrofísica, PUC-Chile, Santiago, Chile); Paz Bluhm (Instituto de Astrofísica, PUC-Chile, Santiago, Chile); Rafael Brahm (Instituto de Astrofísica, PUC-Chile, Santiago, Chile); Néstor Espinoza (Instituto de Astrofísica, PUC-Chile, Santiago, Chile) y Robert Williams (STScI, Baltimore, Maryland, EE.UU.).

ESO es la principal organización astronómica intergubernamental de Europa y el observatorio astronómico más productivo del mundo. Cuenta con el respaldo de dieciséis países: Alemania, Austria, Bélgica, Brasil, Dinamarca, España, Finlandia, Francia, Italia, Países Bajos, Polonia, Portugal, el Reino Unido, República Checa, Suecia y Suiza, junto con el país anfitrión, Chile. ESO desarrolla un ambicioso programa centrado en el diseño, construcción y operación de poderosas instalaciones de observación terrestres que permiten a los astrónomos hacer importantes descubrimientos científicos. ESO también desarrolla un importante papel al promover y organizar la cooperación en investigación astronómica. ESO opera en Chile tres instalaciones de observación únicas en el mundo: La Silla, Paranal y Chajnantor. En Paranal, ESO opera el Very Large Telescope, el observatorio óptico más avanzado del mundo, y dos telescopios de rastreo. VISTA (siglas en inglés de Telescopio de Rastreo Óptico e Infrarrojo para Astronomía) trabaja en el infrarrojo y es el telescopio de rastreo más grande del mundo, y el VST (VLT Survey Telescope, Telescopio de Rastreo del VLT) es el telescopio más grande diseñado exclusivamente para rastrear el cielo en luz visible. ESO es el socio europeo de un revolucionario telescopio, ALMA, actualmente el mayor proyecto astronómico en funcionamiento del mundo. Además, cerca de Paranal, en Cerro Armazones, ESO está construyendo el E-ELT (European Extremely Large Telescope), el telescopio óptico y de infrarrojo cercano de 39 metros que llegará a ser “el ojo más grande del mundo para mirar el cielo”.

Las traducciones de las notas de prensa de ESO las llevan a cabo miembros de la Red de Divulgación de la Ciencia de ESO (ESON por sus siglas en inglés), que incluye a expertos en divulgación y comunicadores científicos de todos los países miembros de ESO y de otras naciones.

El nodo español de la red ESON está representado por J. Miguel Mas Hesse y Natalia Ruiz Zelmanovitch.

Enlaces

Contactos

Francisco Rodríguez I.
ESO
Santiago, Chile
Tlf.: +56 2 24633019
Correo electrónico: frrodrig@eso.org

Luca Izzo
Sapienza University of Rome/ICRANet
Pescara, Italy
Correo electrónico: luca.izzo@gmail.com

Massimo Della Valle
INAF–Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte
Naples, Italy
Correo electrónico: dellavalle@na.astro.it

Luca Pasquini
ESO
Garching bei München, Germany
Tlf.: +49 89 3200 6792
Correo electrónico: lpasquin@eso.org

Richard Hook
ESO Public Information Officer
Garching bei München, Germany
Tlf.: +49 89 3200 6655
Celular: +49 151 1537 3591
Correo electrónico: rhook@eso.org

Connect with ESO on social media

Esta es una traducción de la nota de prensa de ESO eso1531.